Study Suggests Snoring May Worsen Some Conditions

Oxygen-deprived tumors grew more blood vessels in the recent study presented in Muncih.

Oxygen-deprived tumors grew more blood vessels in the recent study presented in Muncih.

There’s yet another reason to take care of that snoring issue now: a new study appears to show a worsening of various medical conditions – even cancer – when regular snoring is present.

The study, presented at the Annual Congress of the European Association of Urology in Munich, involved animals, but may have significant parallels for humans, according to researchers.

Though you may have known chronic snoring is linked to heart attack and stroke, the study surprisingly hints that cancerous tumors may be positively impacted by this lowered oxygen condition – in other words, snoring appeared to encourage the growth of dangerous tumors.

“… (the study) demonstrates the influence of oxygen deficiency on the growth of renal cell carcinoma tissue, both primary tumour as well as metastases,” said Professor Arnulf Stenzl of Tübingen University and Chair of the EAU Congress Committee. However, one must use caution in trusting that animal studies will match reactions in humans, study participants warned.

For some reason that is so far unclear, an oxygen deprived state appeared to encourage the growth of blood vessels in the tumors of the animals studied. This meant more nutrients were made available to the tumors.

The study is a cause for prudence, not panic, according to the researchers. Early treatment may delay or even help reverse certain conditions caused or made worse by snoring.

 

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